Updated Funding Opportunity – Science and Technology Centers: Integrative Partnerships


Our friends in MCB have some important information to share regarding the Science and Technology Centers (STC). Please see their write-up below:

“The Science and Technology Centers (STC): Integrative Partnerships program has released an updated solicitation calling for preliminary proposals that would ultimately lead to the awarding of five new research STCs. Science and Technology Centers support innovative, potentially transformative, complex research and education projects that require large-scale, long-term awards. They provide a means to undertake potentially groundbreaking investigations at the interfaces of disciplines and/or highly innovative approaches within disciplines. These centers can cover research in any topic that is funded by NSF including all areas of biology, and education. They usually include partnerships among academic institutions, national laboratories, industrial organizations, and/or other public/private entities, and international collaborations, as appropriate, to accomplish their research. More information on eligibility and other program specifics can be found in the solicitation 19-567.

Some important details:

  • Submissions of preliminary proposals are limited to 3 proposals per institution
  • Submissions limited to 1 proposal per PI or co-PI
  • Preliminary Proposal Due June 25, 2019
  • Full Proposal Due January 27, 2020

Questions can be answered by reaching out to the cognizant program officer. All proposals submitted in response to this STC solicitation should be submitted in accordance with the revised NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 19-1), which is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after February 25, 2019.”

Meet DEB: Paco Moore


Paco.png

Behind Paco is the town of Longyearbyen (administered by Norway).

Name: Paco Moore

Education: Michigan State University. Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, B.S. Zoology, B.S. Interdepartmental Biology.

Home Institution: The University of Akron

Tell us about your research,

I am a systems biologist interested in the forces structuring scale dependent patterns and emergent properties. I am particularly interested in evolution of complex traits in structured environments. I do not have a particular research system but enjoy working across systems. I have worked with fish, tetrapods, crustaceans, vascular and non-vascular plants, eubacteria, fungi, and protists. My work is primarily lab based but also has small field, theory and bioinformatic components. My studies usually fall in what I would call evolutionary genetics, but at times my questions have led me into systematics, community and ecosystem ecology, animal behavior, development, anatomy, physiology and biomaterials research. The greatest privilege of my life has been to receive the support of my home department in a career that has sacrificed total productivity in search of the broadest possible view. If I were to look for a single lesson from my research it is that the question is not if, but how much, the dynamics of a system are altered by interactions we have not been exploring.

What made you want to serve NSF?

I enjoy the idea that I can help the environmental biology research community by giving back some of the mentorship I have been shown over the last 30 years. DEB tends to have a unique blend of researchers that often receive some of their funding from outside DEB. I relish the opportunity to nurture the development of the community’s core interests and progress in DEB science while also supporting the community in its exploration of those interdisciplinary links that help forge new directions in environmental biology. In a vibrant, dynamic field like ours, investigators at all career stages benefit from communication with their colleagues, be it through mentorship, discussion, or even debate and NSF supports and listens to that communication. Service at NSF will therefore also allow me to better understand the driving questions and ambitions of what I find to be the most engaging field of study, ecology and evolutionary biology.

What are you most looking forward to during your tenure at NSF?

First and foremost, I look forward to interacting with our community. I see a major portion of my job is to provide information on the logistics, limitations and priorities of various funding opportunities. The flip side of discussing opportunity is the discussion of failed proposals, and it might seem to be a less than rewarding part of the job. However, when informed by a program officer’s knowledge of the decision process, a discussion of declined proposals is perhaps the best door for an investigator into understanding how to succeed. For this reason, I look forward to discussions with the community at all stages of the funding process.

My second most anticipated activity during my time at NSF is to help promote research that elucidates the dynamics that lead to scale dependent pattern and emergent properties. New funding opportunities both within and across divisions (e.g. Rules of Life, Bridging Ecology and Evolution) provide an incentive to the community to explore the space between disciplines that will alter pattern and dynamics across scales. I am excited to be back at NSF at a time when I can help nurture the DEB community as it determines the directions that these new programs will take.

PAPPG 19-1 Now Available


There’s a new version of the Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide, or PAPPG (NSF 19-1). Check out a summary of the significant changes from prior versions and clarifications found in the new PAPPG here: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappg19_1/sigchanges.jsp

For international collaborations, please note the Cover Page has a new box to check for any international subawards and consultancies.

The guidelines in NSF 19-1 apply for proposals submitted or due, or awards made, on or after February 25, 2019. For instance, starting today (March 4, 2019) any RAPID or EAGER proposals intended for DEB would list the NSF 19-1 PAPPG program announcement number on the proposal cover page.

The PAPPG contains the full set of general guidelines to PIs, and includes everything from proposal preparation to award reporting and close-out. Many program-specific solicitations will reference the PAPPG for instructions on proposal submission, so it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with this document and make sure that your Sponsored Projects Office is aware of this new version.

 

Harnessing the Data Revolution: New Funding Opportunities


From our friends over at DBI,

“We would like to draw your attention to a new funding opportunity that may be of interest to our community. NSF’s Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) is a national-scale activity to enable new modes of data-driven discovery that will allow fundamental questions to be asked and answered at the frontiers of science and engineering. The HDR vision is realized through an interrelated set of activities and funding opportunities.  Each of these efforts is designed to amplify the intrinsically multidisciplinary nature of the emerging field of data science.

I would like to particularly note the HDR: Institutes portion of this initiative. This activity is specifically designed to form interdisciplinary teams of researchers and technical experts to apply advanced approaches from data science to significant research questions where there is potential for major advance by harnessing untapped potential in data. There are two solicitations offered for this activity:

NSF 19-543: Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR): Institutes for Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering – Ideas Labs (I-DIRSE-IL)

NSF 19-549:  Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR): Institutes for Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering – Frameworks (I-DIRSE-FW)

The first solicitation targets individuals who wish to participate in an Ideas Lab workshop where they can find new collaborators to team with and develop a proposal for two-year prototype project. The second targets teams that are already formed and wish to submit a proposal for a two-year prototype project. In both cases, success for this activity rests on balanced participation by individuals with diverse skills – both researchers with intimate knowledge of the science to help frame the research challenges and define requirements and data science experts with experience in cyberinfrastructure, computational science, math, and statistics. This communication is going out to our entire research community to promote participation by individuals that fit any of these above descriptions. We encourage you to look at these solicitations, attend the webinar listed below, or visit the HDR website at: https://www.nsf.gov/cise/harnessingdata/

Some of these solicitations were released just prior to the lapse in federal appropriations; others were delayed by it. To give the community more opportunity to respond, the deadlines for these activities have been revised as below:

Deadline Updates for HDR Solicitations

Due to the recent 35-day lapse in appropriations and shutdown of the agency, NSF will be extending the deadline dates for the HDR solicitations noted below:

Pub ID Title Original Deadline Submission Type New Deadline Date
19-543 Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR): Institutes for Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering – Ideas Labs (I-DIRSE-IL) 28-Jan-19 Preliminary proposals 4-Mar-19

 

 

MacroSystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science Webinar 2/6/19, 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST.


The MacroSystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science (MSB-NES) program of the National Science Foundation will host an open-forum webinar with Program Directors this February 6, 2019, 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST. Instructions for joining the session can be found here.* The webinar will be recorded, and a public link will appear at this location.

The program solicitation (NSF 19-538) invites innovative proposals to detect, quantify, and forecast the consequences of changing climate, land-use, and invasive species for the biosphere at regional to continental scales (see DEBrief). The Macrosystems Biology program also invites proposals for Research Coordination Networks for driving convergent science with the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) (NSF 19-031). Proposals share the due date of February 25, 2019.

Please note: The due date for this solicitation was not impacted by the recent federal lapse in appropriations, and it is not expected to change if another lapse follows the end of the continuing resolution on February 15 2019. Fastlane, Grants.gov, and Research.gov are expected to be functional and open for proposal submission. Find more information here.

*UPDATE: If you missed the webinar, you can find the recording here.

 

We’re Back!


 

back

PicItUp/Shutterstock.com

We’re happy to report that NSF is fully operational. Because we’re playing catch-up, please be patient about replies to any emails you may have sent during the shut-down.

If you have any questions about the recent lapse in appropriations, and/or need guidance on programs with REVISED deadlines (NNA, for example), and/or post-award administration please start here.

Our Assistant Director also published a letter to community members over at the BIO OAD blog.

And as always, feel free to reach out to any DEB Program Officer or email us at debquestions@nsf.gov.

MacroSystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science (MSB-NES)


Here’s some news as we enter the home stretch for 2018: the MacroSystems Biology (MSB) program has released a new solicitation for proposals under the revised program title “MacroSystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science (MSB-NES)”. The solicitation recognizes the completion of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) as a major instrument for studying regional- to continental-scale ecological research questions. You can find the program summary here.

The solicitation (NSF 19-538) invites innovative proposals to detect, quantify, and forecast the consequences of changing climate, land-use, and invasive species for the biosphere at regional to continental scales. The program targets the massive knowledge gap between processes that occur at local ecological scales and the global processes that drive the distribution of ecosystems and biomes. Additionally, it recognizes that drivers of ecological change occur at multiple scales of time and space, and that processes may interact across scales in nonlinear fashion. As ever, the program encourages planning, training, and development activities that enable groups to conduct research at macrosystem scales.

The current solicitation includes two tracks. The first track, named Macrosystems Research Awards (‘MRA’), will continue to support ambitious, quantitative, team projects that have shaped the emerging field of macrosystems ecology over the past decade.

The second track (Macrosystems Small Awards, ‘MSA’) provides opportunities for small teams of researchers tackling more narrowly targeted questions and approaches to advance understanding of regional to continental-scale processes. Such a project may, for example, address a single theoretical challenge, such as scaling, or focus on development of NEON-enabled tools that shed light on multi-scale drivers of an ecosystem process.

Both tracks will prioritize proposals that use the massive data streams flowing from 81 NEON aquatic and terrestrial sites situated within 20 climatically defined domains across the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. NEON data products are already streaming and openly available to all.

In addition to research proposals, the MSB program encourages proposals for the Research Coordination Network (RCN) program to support groups of investigators to coalesce around new ways to engage with NEON.

The due date for proposals is February 25, 2019.

To view examples of past awards and for any additional questions regarding MSB-NES, please visit the program page and contact Program Officers Michael Binford or Dan Gruner, directly.