INCLUDES Virtual Office Hour


From our friends in the Office of the Assistant Director;

“Please join us for the upcoming information session on the Inclusion Across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES) program on October 17th, 2019 from 1pm-2pm EST!

During this Virtual Office Hour, program directors from the NSF INCLUDES Implementation Team will discuss the program’s history and new planning grants solicitation (NSF 19-600). Following the discussion, program directors from NSF INCLUDES and the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) will answer questions from attendees during an open question and answer period.

Join us remotely and bring questions, comments and concerns! Please use the registration link below to register for our October 17th Virtual Office Hour.

Click here to register

NSF INCLUDES is one of the 10 Big Ideas and is a comprehensive national initiative to enhance U.S. leadership in STEM discoveries and innovations focused on NSF’s commitment to diversity, inclusion and broadening participation in these fields. These planning grants support efforts necessary to build capacity to establish future centers, alliances or other large-scale networks endeavoring to address a broadening participation challenge in STEM at scale.

The first deadline for full proposals is December 3, 2019.

For more details, refer to the full solicitation: NSF 19-600″

We need GRFP Reviewers!


The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing full-time research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in STEM.

The GRFP is expected to receive thousands of applications and we need more reviewers with Ecological and Neuroscience backgrounds. If you are interested in serving as a reviewer, please register at this link:

https://nsfgrfp.org/panelist_info/registration

Registration simply signals your interest to the managing Program Officer and is not an obligation or commitment to review. Please share this link with anyone you know who might be interested in serving as a reviewer.
For GRFP applicants, remember: The full proposal deadline for Life Sciences is October 21, 2019.

For more information about the GRFP, please visit the program page and FAQs.

Webinar Dates and Times for the Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Biology


This October, our friends over in DBI are hosting 2 webinars on the Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Biology. Check out the details on their blog here or below:

“Interested in applying to the Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Biology (PRFB) program this fall? The deadline is November 19, 2019. To support your application, we will be hosting two webinars, as listed below.

  1. Tuesday, October 15th from 3:00-4:30 PM EDT (Join Here)
  2. Friday, October 18th from 1:00-2:30 PM EDT (Join Here)

As a reminder:

  • This is the last year that the ‘Collections’ Competitive Area will be offered. However, in future years, it is expected that research using biological collections could be proposed in other Competitive Areas.
  • There is a new Competitive Area – ‘Integrative Research Investigating the Rules of Life Governing Interactions Between Genomes, Environment and Phenotypes’.
  • The eligibility criterion related to tenure in a position requiring a doctoral degree for Competitive Areas ‘Broadening Participation of Groups Underrepresented in Biology’ and ‘Interdisciplinary Research Using Biological Collections’ has increased to 9 full time months. This criterion applies to the new Competitive Area as well.

In the meantime, please use the full solicitation (NSF 19-567) to support your application, and see here for an example of a past PRFB project that has made the news!”

New EEID and LTER Solicitations


The new Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (EEID) solicitation is live. The scope of the new solicitation has been expanded to include ocean systems as well as a new international partnership with the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) in the UK. The deadline to submit your full proposal to EEID is November 20th, 2019.

The Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program has just released a solicitation for a New Urban LTER site (19-584). The Urban deadline for preliminary proposals is December 4th, 2019.

Visit the program webpage and updated FAQs for more information.

Meet DEB: Ford Ballantyne and Diana Pilson


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Ford Ballantyne

What’s your name and role here at DEB? My Name is Ford Ballantyne, and I am a rotating Program Officer with the Ecosystem Sciences Cluster.

Where did you go to school? I earned a BS in Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, my MS in Statistics at the University of New Mexico, and my PhD in Biology at the University of New Mexico.

Where is your home institution? University of Georgia.

Tell us about your research. I use a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches to understand how smaller scale processes generate whole ecosystem phenomena. I am particularly interested in linking microbial metabolism to biogeochemical cycles. Past and ongoing projects include studying the influence of environmental conditions on the decomposition of organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic environments, linking whole community patterns of gene expression to changes in the composition of dissolved organic carbon, and quantifying the response of whole stream metabolism to variation in environmental conditions across latitude.

Why do you want to serve with NSF? I was drawn to the Program Officer position because I wanted to be part of the collaborative atmosphere at NSF and to serve the broader scientific community. I like helping others succeed, and I like to contribute to collective endeavors. NSF is a great place to do both.

What are you looking forward to in your tenure here at NSF? I look forward to learning about all the research that is supported by the Ecosystems Cluster and DEB as a whole, and to contributing to discussions about new funding initiatives and future directions for ecological science. I love to read science and talk about ideas, and I am eager to read the many proposals that the Ecosystems Cluster will review and to be a part of the intellectually stimulating discussion of proposed research during panels.

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Diana Pilson

What’s your name and role here at DEB? My name is Diana Pilson, and I am a rotating Program Officer in the Population and Community Ecology Cluster.

Where did you go to school? I earned a B.S. in Biology from Tufts University and my Ph.D. in Zoology from Duke University.

Where is your home institution? My home institution is the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where I am in the School of Biological Sciences.

Tell us about your research. I am a plant evolutionary ecologist, and I am broadly interested in how environmental variation and species interactions affect (and are in turn affected by) the outcomes of natural selection. Over my career I have worked on the population biology and evolution of plant-insect interactions (from both the plant and insect perspective), potential fitness effects and ecological consequences of the escape of transgenic insect and virus resistance into wild populations, and effects of seed production and disturbance on local colonization and extinction dynamics. I recently completed a several-year stint as an Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences. I am now excited to be doing science again, and I just initiated a study of flower color and demography in Calochortus eurycarpus (Liliaceae).

Why do you want to serve with NSF? In the Dean’s Office I enjoyed both the collaborative nature of the work and the bigger-scale view I had of the University. Here at NSF I am expecting a similar experience. The collaborative work will be fun: over the last 20+ years I have served on many NSF panels, and every time I learned a lot, met interesting and smart people, and been impressed with the care and thought that everyone put into proposal evaluation. And, I am looking forward to getting a bigger scale look at (and contributing to) current and future directions in ecology and evolution.

What are you looking forward to in your tenure here at NSF? I expect that contributing to the future of our science from inside NSF will be challenging, enlightening, and gratifying. Plus, living in Alexandria, far from the heartland, for a while will be an exciting change of pace.

 

CNH2 LOIs Due Soon


While I’m sure those investigators planning on submitting to the CNH2 program this year are well on their way, this is a short reminder that the due date for the Letter of Intent (LOI) is September 17th, 2019.

If you submitted a LOI to the December 2018 deadline and are planning to submit one to the September 17, 2019 deadline, please note that the system retained your earlier submission and issues a warning that you have already submitted when you are trying to submit again.  Please IGNORE this warning and submit your new LOI.  The system lets you submit another.

For those unfamiliar with the program, CNH2 supports research projects that advance basic scientific understanding of integrated socio-environmental systems and the interactions (dynamics, processes, and feedbacks) within and among the environmental (biological, physical and chemical) and human (“socio”) (economic, social, political, or behavioral) components of such a system.

Be sure and check out the solicitation for more information and contact the managing Program Officers for any additional questions.