Upcoming Biology Integration Institutes Webinar


Please join us for the upcoming webinar about the Biology Integration Institutes (BII) on November 18th, 2019 at 2pm EST!

During this webinar, program directors from the BIO BII Team will address questions about the recently released solicitation (NSF 20-508).

Use the registration link below to register for our November 18th webinar.

Click here to register

The BII is a new funding opportunity to strengthen the connections between biological subdisciplines and encourage a reintegration of biology. This funding opportunity is a part of BIO’s larger efforts to stimulate integrative thinking in the biological research community.

To learn more about the Biology Integration Institutes, visit the solicitation and program website.

Letters of Intent for Implementation Proposals are due December 20, 2019. The deadline for full proposals, in both the Design and Implementation tracks, is February 6, 2020.

Share Your #NSFstories


NSF is active on social media platforms and is ready to engage with you and your exciting science. But the internet is loud and simply bursting with cat videos, so what’s the quickest way to get in touch with NSF?

Tag us!

As scientists, you can appreciate the value of proper labeling and classification, and that’s what those fun hashtags are for! Use #NSFstories and/or #NSFfunded when posting online so we can see and share your discoveries or events.

Email us!

Do you want us to help promote your NSF-funded work on our platforms? Send your research updates to your Program Officer and they will forward them on to our social media team.

Check us out on:

  NSF NSF BIO
Twitter www.twitter.com/NSF http://www.twitter.com/NSF_BIO
Facebook www.facebook.com/US.NSF  
Instagram www.instagram.com/nsfgov  
Pinterest www.pinterest.com/USNSF  
YouTube www.youtube.com/user/VideosatNSF  

 

NEON Webinar


From our friends over at the DBI blog,

“The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently announced its intention to carry out a competition to manage the Operations and Maintenance of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The Dear Colleague Letter (NSF 19-080) announcing this decision:

  • provides general information on NEON,
  • communicates that NSF anticipates initiating the competition,
  • provides information on provisional goals,
  • outlines a timeline for the competition, and
  • invites comments and questions from eligible organizations interested in this competition (submit via neon-bot@nsf.gov).

NSF will be hosting a webinar on September 11th at 2pm regarding the planned competition for operation and management of NEON. Individuals, teams, and organizations interested in submitting proposals should try to participate.

This webinar will discuss the timeline for executing the competition for the management of NEON Operations and Maintenance. It will highlight key decision points by NSF and identify critical dates for activities related to the competition. The webinar will also provide information on the post-award oversight requirements for awards managed through cooperative agreements (CAs). Following the presentation, there will be a question and answer period.

For further details about the competition, please consult the NEON Program webpage and DCL (NSF 19-080).

For more details about NEON, please consult the NEON Project webpage.”

Undergraduate and Graduate Opportunities at NSF


How’s your summer going? Too early to start thinking about next summer? What about winter or spring break? We don’t think so! Be sure and share these opportunities with your undergraduates, graduate students, and recent graduates.

Summer Scholars: undergraduate and graduate internships at NSF

NSF hosts about 20 Summer Scholars for 10 weeks during the summer. NSF Program Officers serve as mentors and create a work plan for the student. That work plan is submitted to the NSF Summer Scholars Program for approval and then those internships are advertised through 3 organizations; the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), the Quality Education for Minorities Network (QEM), and the Washington Internships for Native Students (WINS). Students need to apply through one of those three associations, not to NSF.

This internship program is designed to serve under-represented students. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to see what it’s like to serve within the Federal sector as well as encourage students to pursue advanced studies in STEM.

As for compensation, summer scholarships can include housing and stipends for undergraduate and graduate students.

REU Sites: research experiences for undergraduates

If students would rather do research at a University lab than work at a Federal agency, they can apply to an REU Site. REU Sites receive funding from NSF to engage undergraduate students in research. Like the Summer Scholar Program, students don’t apply through NSF but have to contact an REU Site directly and apply with that particular site. A list of REU Sites can be found here.

REU Supplements: research experiences for undergraduates

Investigators currently receiving funding from NSF for awards can apply for REU Supplements. Supplements are designed to give undergraduates a genuine research experience similar to REU Site experiences but instead of being offered through an institution, supplements are managed by NSF-funded investigators. Students must seek out those supplement opportunities through active awards, reaching out to labs and inquiring if they have applied (or are planning to apply) for supplements, or paying attention to their local college or university job board.

Stipends for REU students vary depending on location and project but they generally range between $6,000-8,000 and last between 6-10 weeks.

Special Programs for Undergraduates

Here’s a collection of special programs that provide either direct (i.e., from NSF) or indirect (i.e., from an awardee institution) funding for students interested in training and curricula development. They vary in application processes, stipends, and objectives so read them carefully and don’t hesitate to reach out to the program contacts listed on the program webpages.

Pathways: internships and fellowships at Federal agencies

Maybe Federal service is where your heart is, after all. If that’s the case, you’ll need to apply through the USAJobs portal. Of course, you can apply for any federal government job that you qualify for, but there are specific programs that help students and recent graduates get their foot in the door.

  1. There’s the Pathways Internship Program for current students.
  2. The Recent Graduates Program for, you guessed it, recent graduates.
  3. And the Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Program for those with an advanced degree (Masters or PhD).

Pathways interns and PMFs earn an annual salary that varies by agency and location. Some Federal agencies may also offer internships outside of the Pathways Program but those are generally unpaid.

 

Reintegrating Biology Town Halls


Learn about this exciting new initiative and register for town hall discussions from the Office of the Assistant Director’s blog here or below.

“Biology has the goal of understanding the processes that generate and sustain life.  Despite this unifying principle, the actual practice of modern biology has become increasingly fragmented into subdisciplines due, in part, to specialized approaches required for deep study of narrowly defined problems.  BIO aims to encourage a unification of biology. Our goal is to stimulate creative integration of diverse biological disciplines using innovative experimental, theoretical, and computational approaches to discover underlying principles operating across all hierarchical levels of life, from biomolecules to organisms, species, ecosystems, and biomes.

Earlier this year we asked you, as members of the biological sciences community, for high-level ideas on the research questions and topics that would benefit from NSF investment in a truly integrated research environment. The responses from across the country offered a broad range of fundamental biological questions spanning the scales of biological organization. BIO now wants to grow and enrich the conversation with a view to priming the formation of new NSF-supported research teams around these questions.

To that end, we invite you to register for one of several Virtual Town Hall discussions, which will take place the week of September 16, 2019. These events will help identify themes for more focused, in-person discussions that will take place later in the fall – fertile soil for germination of new, foundational cross-disciplinary ideas that will unify and advance the biological sciences.

More details can be found at https://reintegratingbiology.org/.”

Now Hiring: Deputy Division Director!


The Directorate for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation is seeking a Deputy Division Director for the Division of Environmental Biology (DEB). This is a Senior Executive Service (SES) position within the Federal government, which can be filled as either a Federal employee, or as a rotator (Intergovernmental Personnel Act, 1-3 years), as described here:  https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/536933400

The Deputy Division Director plays a key role in the Division’s senior management, contributing to science planning, management, and program budget allocation and commitment for the Division. The Deputy Division Director advises and aids the Division Director, and is a member of the broader senior management team in the Directorate for Biological Sciences.

The Division of Environmental Biology supports research and training on evolutionary and ecological processes acting at the level of populations, species, communities, and ecosystems.

You can read more about DEB’s structure and mission here: https://www.nsf.gov/bio/deb/about.jsp

For details on how to apply, please visit the job announcement. You may email the Division Director Stephanie Hampton (shampton@nsf.gov) with any additional questions.