NSF Research Traineeship Solicitation and Webinar


The National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) Program will be hosting a live, open-forum Q&A with NRT Program Directors this November 15, 2018, 1:30 – 2:30 pm EST. Dates and instructions for joining the Q&A sessions can be found here.

The NRT program is designed to encourage new and innovative models for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduate education training.

The NRT Synopsis states, “The program is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary or convergent research areas, through the use of a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs. Proposals are requested in any interdisciplinary or convergent research theme of national priority, with special emphasis on the research areas in NSF’s 10 Big Ideas. The NSF research Big Ideas are Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR), The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (FW-HTF), Navigating the New Arctic (NNA), Windows on the Universe: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics (WoU), The Quantum Leap: Leading the Next Quantum Revolution (QL), and Understanding the Rules of Life: Predicting Phenotype (URoL).”

Please note: This solicitation has limits on the number of proposals per organization and PI/co-PI. In addition, there is a required letter of intent (Deadline Dec 6, 2018).

AccelNet Webinar Monday, 11/5/18


What is AccelNet?

Learn all about it from the BIO OAD Blog, “Accelerating Research through International Network-to-Network Collaborations (AccelNet) supports strategic linkages among U.S. research networks and complementary networks abroad that will leverage research and educational resources to tackle grand scientific challenges that require significant coordinated international efforts.  AccelNet invites proposals, submitted by U.S.-based researchers, for the creation of international networks of networks in research areas aligned either with one of the NSF Big Ideas or a community-identified challenge with international dimensions.

For the first competition, Letters of Intent for are due December 21, 2018 and Full Proposals due February 28, 2019.  The NSF Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) funded several workshops that will take place in 2019, and we will offer webinars for the community.

The first webinar will be this Monday, November 5 – visit the event page for webcast info. Updates on future webinars will be posted on the program page.

Additional information on this program is available on the AccelNet Program Page. We invite you to direct any questions to oise-accelnet@nsf.gov.”

OPUS and EEID Deadlines are Coming Up!


While our Core Programs have moved to a no-deadline model, there are still some special programs that have a submission deadline:

  • Opportunities for Promoting Understanding through Synthesis (OPUS) proposals are due November 19, 2018.
  • Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (EEID) proposals are due November 21, 2018.

New OPUS Solicitation


The OPUS (Opportunities for Promoting Understanding through Synthesis) program enables PIs to create new understanding of their research systems and questions by supporting synthesis activities based on published, peer-reviewed research. The traditional OPUS is now called OPUS: CRS (Core Research Synthesis). This presents an opportunity for a researcher at any career stage to synthesize a significant body of their research to create a new and enhanced understanding of an important topic in DEB science.

The new OPUS: MCS (Mid-Career Synthesis) track targets a specific academic rank (associate professor or equivalent) at a critical career stage. An OPUS: MCS requires the PI to collaborate with a mentor at another institution to acquire needed knowledge or skills to enable a new synthesis of their research interests. Projects should present a compelling case that the planned activities and products will provide new insights to existing problems or identify new, but related, problems that were previously inaccessible without the new methodology or approach. Hopefully, the result will enhance the PI’s productivity, improve their retention as scientists, and promote a diverse scientific workforce, including more minorities and women at high academic ranks.

The two tracks are outlined in detail on the OPUS web site and in the solicitation (NSF 18-582). If you are considering an OPUS submission, we suggest that you email one of the OPUS contacts listed on that web page as well as a program officer in the appropriate DEB cluster for your research area.

Coastlines and People (CoPe) Scoping Sessions: Apply to attend workshops Sept. 26-28, 2018


We’re encouraging you to apply to attend scoping sessions to identify priorities for a research initiative focused on coastal regions. Applications are due by August 12, 2018 (11:59pm local time) and the workshops will be held September 26-28, 2018. More information is available on the CoPe scoping session website https://coastlinesandpeople.org/.
 
Coasts are paramount to our nation’s economic prosperity, sustainability and national security. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate of Geosciences in collaboration with the Directorates for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences, Engineering, Education and Human Resources, and Biological Sciences are looking to better understand the research priorities related to advancing understanding of the impacts of coastal environmental variability and natural hazards on populated coastal regions. The outcomes from these scoping sessions will inform future research opportunities from NSF to expand and innovate coastal research and include state, federal and local stakeholders.  Interdisciplinary research on coastal processes, the built environment, and the people that inhabit coastal regions, serves as an opportunity to engage under-represented groups and build on broadening participation efforts of NSF’s INCLUDES.
 
Four, simultaneous, three-day scoping sessions will be hosted by the University Cooperation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR )and facilitated by KnowInnovation on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Workshop sites include San Diego, California, Chicago, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia with a fourth ‘virtual’ workshop held on mountain time.
 
Applicants will be notified by late August. Travel support will be provided for participants invited to attend. More information and answers to frequently asked questions can be found on the CoPe scoping workshop website https://coastlinesandpeople.org.

Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER)- Call for Proposals


DEB would like to announce that the Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER) program will be issuing a call for pre-proposals this winter. The program is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), managed by the National Academies of Science and coordinated with six federal agencies, including NSF. Its goal is “to build scientific capacity and empower researchers in developing countries to use science, technology, innovation, and partnerships to address local and global development challenges.”

Who should apply?

Currently funded principal investigators looking for grants to support collaborators in PEER-eligible countries and focus areas.

U.S. researchers cannot submit PEER proposals. Instead, they must be submitted by foreign collaborators working with US PIs with active awards from NSF, NASA, NIH, Smithsonian Institution, USDA, and/or USGS.

Who is eligible?

Applicants must:

  • Be based at an academic institution, non-profit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center, or institute in a PEER-eligible country or focus area;
  • Hold a career-track position or equivalent at their institution;
  • Work in the country from which they are applying; and
  • Be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of the PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

See full eligibility requirements here.

What are the due dates and how do I apply?

A new call for proposals will be issued in October 2017 and the deadline for pre-proposals is January 12th, 2018. Pre-proposals must be submitted through this online application system. Please keep checking the National Academies website for updates and further due date information.

Where can I find more information?

NSF Guidelines and Contact Information

Program Details and Updates on the National Academies Website

FAQs

 

 

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Biology Deadline


The annual deadline for the next round of Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Biology (PRFB) is November 7th, 2017. There’s a great “How to Apply” guide on the PRFB website that walks you through each step of the application process. You must be affiliated with an institution the entire tenure of the fellowship. You must also register as an Independent Researcher through https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/ before you can submit to the Program.

Applicants submit to one of three categories called “competitive areas.” These categories differ in award duration, research scope, and eligibility requirements. The competitive areas are: 1) Broadening Participation in Biology, 2) Interdisciplinary Research Using Biological Collections, 3) National Plant Genome Initiative Postdoctoral Research Fellowships.

To qualify for the first two competitive areas, Broadening Participation and Interdisciplinary Research Using Biological Collections, postdocs cannot have served in any full-time position that requires a doctoral degree for more than 6 months prior to the deadline. For the third competitive area, National Plant Genome Initiative, it’s less than 12 months. In sum, these fellowships are for postdocs who very recently received a PhD.

A completed PRFB application will contain the following sections and each is outlined and described in more detail in the solicitation;

  1. NSF Cover Page
  2. Fastlane application form (this form can only be accessed in FastLane)
  3. Project Summary (one page, only)
  4. Project Description (limited to 6 pages, including all figures and tables)
  5. References Cited (no page limit)
  6. Biographical Sketch (page limit of 2)
  7. Current and Pending Support (be sure and include current and planned submissions to other fellowship programs)
  8. Two letters of reference (submitted directly to FastLane by the letters’ authors)

The duration of the fellowship for the first two competitive areas is 24-36 continuous months, while that of the third competitive area is 36 continuous months. As for the award amounts, please see the solicitation. For additional questions about the PRFB, please email bio-dbi-prfb@nsf.gov and best of luck!